Best Winter Cocktails

Now that our weather down here is finally cold, we wanted to share with you some of our favorite winter cocktails!

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Bourbon Milk Punch

Originating as early as the 1600s, milk punches are now associated with New Orleans, where they’re enjoyed at brunch or during holidays. This fortifying cocktail goes with waffles or eggs or by itself for a liquid breakfast.

Ingredients

  • 2 ounces brandy or bourbon
  • 1/2 cup whole milk
  • 1 teaspoon powdered sugar
  • 1/4 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • freshly grated nutmeg
  1. Shake ingredients with ice and strain into a chilled rocks glass filled with ice.
  2. Garnish with nutmeg. Makes one serving

 

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Classic Sazerac

According to Rob Chirico, author of the Field Guide to Cocktails, this iconic New Orleans cocktail dates to the 1850s, when it was served at the Sazerac Coffee House. American whiskey eventually replaced the brandy of the original. Rinsing the glass with absinthe gives the cocktail the right touch of herbal perfume without upsetting the balance—you can always substitute Pernod if you don’t happen to have a bottle of absinthe.

Ingredients

  • Lemon peel
  • 1 barspoon absinthe (or Pernod)
  • Ice
  • 1 dash angostura bitters
  • 2 dashes Peychaud’s Bitters
  • 1 1/2 ounces rye whiskey
  • Water
  • 1 sugar cube
  1. Put the sugar cube in a mixing glass with just enough water to moisten it. Use the back of a barspoon to crush the cube.
  2. Add the rye, both bitters, and ice and stir until chilled, about 30 seconds.
  3. Add the absinthe to a chilled Old Fashioned glass. Turn the glass to coat the sides with the absinthe, then pour out the excess.
  4. Strain the rye mixture into the absinthe-coated glass.
  5. Twist and squeeze the lemon peel over the glass. Rub the rim of the glass with the peel, drop it into the cocktail, and serve.     Makes one Serving

 

winter-cocktail

Hot Buttered Rum
After molasses began being imported to Colonial America from Jamaica, and distilleries opened in New England in the 1650s, colonists began adding distilled rum to hot beverages such as toddies and nogs, creating beverages such as hot buttered rum and eggnog, among others. We would like to thank them very much for that!
Ingredients
  • 1 cup heavy whipping cream
  • 5 tablespoons powdered sugar
  • 2 cups water
  • 1/4 cup butter
  • 2/3 cup dark brown sugar
  • 3/4 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1/2 teaspoon nutmeg
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground cloves
  • 1/8 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 2/3 cup spiced rum
  • cinnamon sticks for serving (optional)
  1. In the chilled bowl of an electric mixer, beat the heavy whipping cream and powdered sugar together to stiff peaks.
  2. Set this in the fridge.
  3. In a heavy saucepan over medium-high heat, bring the water, butter, brown sugar, cinnamon, cloves, nutmeg, and salt to a boil. Reduce the heat and let the mixture simmer for 10 minutes, whisking occasionally. Remove from the heat and stir in the vanilla extract and spiced rum. Pour into mugs and top with whipped cream, a sprinkle of nutmeg, and a cinnamon stick. Serve immediately. Makes 4 servings
Date: November 21, 2016
Posted by: Anne-Marie Varnell
Categories: food & drink